Asian Food and Cookery

Asian Food and Cookery

 

China

Introduction

When I first ate Chinese food in the UK in the 1970s, it was really quite unappealing. Everything came in a gloopy sauce and seemed to taste the same, due to the overuse of monosodium glutamate, supposedly a flavour enhancer but in reality, nothing of the kind. Then in the 1980s a new breed of Chinese restaurant arrived (at least it took that long to reach the provinces) which provided lighter, tastier Chinese cooking demonstrating regional differences. There was one drawback, however, which was that this new type of restaurant was much more expensive than the original cheap ‘n tasteless ones. Consequently, I thought how nice it would be to cook Chinese food at home but I had no idea where to start until BBC TV came to my rescue in the shape of Ken Hom, the USA-born chef of Cantonese parents.… Continue reading

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Buddha’s Stir-Fried Vegetables Recipe

Chinese Food Made Easy

This recipe for stir-fried vegetables comes from Ching-He Huang’s wonderful book, Chinese Food Made EasyChinese Food Made Easy so I’m sure you’ll enjoy it along with any of her other recipes that you try.  If you can’t get some of the mushrooms, substitute any wild mushrooms or other vegetables.

Serves 2

Ingredients

1 tbsp groundnut oil
2 dried Chinese mushrooms, pre-soaked in cold water for 20 minutes, drained and sliced
1 small carrot, sliced
1 handful of mangetout
1 small handful of deep-fried dofu (bean curd)
1 small handful of dried wood ear mushrooms, pre-soaked in hot water for 20 minutes and drained
1 small handful of baby corn, sliced
1 small handful of bean sprouts
100ml hot vegetable stock
2 tbsp light soy sauce
2 tbsp vegetarian oyster sauce
1 tsp toasted sesame oil
1 large spring onion, sliced
1 tsp cornflour blended with 1 tbsp cold water
1 small handful of raw enoki mushrooms
Steamed jasmine rice to serve

  1. Heat a wok over a high heat, add the groundnut oil and stir-fry the Chinese mushrooms until the fragrance is released.
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I have to do a country project for my Language Arts class and I have China. I have to make some chinese food for the project and I want to know what’s easy to make but won’t break my mom’s wallet. Plus there are 24 people in the class. Any ideas?

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I have mastered Mexican and now would like to learn how to cook Chinese yum! I’m wondering what cut of beef is most popular in dishes like Mongolian beef and chow mein and pretty much every takeout box I’ve ever gotten. They all seem to have the same texture to me. Any Chinese food experts out there? Also, what type of oil do they usually cook with, peanut? I’m talking about your every day Chinese takeout, nothin fancy here.

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The cuisines of China (particularly the Cantonese) are dominating Hong Kong’s culinary scene, and that is no surprise, as most Hong Kongers are of Cantonese origin.  Alongside the Chinese cuisines, you will find many restaurants specializing in other Far East cuisines, such as Japanese, Korean, Thai, Vietnamese, Indian and others… European and British influence can also be found, as Hong Kong was a British colony for more than 150 years.

Moreover, it can be said that during the years Hong Kong developed its own unique cuisine that combines Cantonese cooking with other elements…

Yum cha (“drinking tea”) is an integral part of Hong Kong’s culinary culture.

This Cantonese term refers to the custom of eating small servings of different foods, mainly dim sum, while sipping Chinese tea.… Continue reading

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I’d like to learn to cook Chinese food. Recipe with pictire will help a lot.

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We have rice and mashed potatoes, what goes well with it from usual chinese food takeout so we can order it? Thanx!

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I’ve heard that chinese food is different in taste/look in the USA than in China. Does anyone know what the primary differences are? And are theyre any differences in restaurant environment in a restaurant in the USA in comparison to a restaurant in China?

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I have always loved Chinese takeout, but I know that alot of it has been created to appeal to Westerners. How different is it from the food that Chinese people make for themselves?
I think I will try an authentic Chinese restaurant! I live in Philadelphia, and we have a fairly large Chinatown.

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My husband and I are both on Weight Watchers, but we are craving Chinese food. We are sick of stir-fry, so what are some other healthy Chinese food dishes we can cook at home? Skill level and equipment are not an issue – I have all sorts of kitchen gadgets.
Thanks!

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