Asian Food and Cookery

Asian Food and Cookery

 

indian food

Indian Food as Part of a Weight Loss Regime

Most people think that you can’t possibly eat Indian food, if you’re on a slimming diet. That’s a fair statement if you always eat Indian food in restaurants, because many traditional Indian recipes involve either deep frying or the use of ghee (clarified butter). However, if you cook Indian food at home, it can easily form part of a weight loss regime, just the same as any other food. You just need to follow a few simple general rules.

– Avoid altogether recipes which involve deep frying.
– If you need to seal meat before braising it for a curry, use a good non-stick pan and a spray bottle with sunflower or vegetable oil in it.… Continue reading

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The Cooking of Kerala by Liz Canham

Kerala is situated on the South West coast of India right beside Tamil Nadu. The capital is Trivandrum with its bustling harbour lined with fishing nets and home to fishing boats of all shapes and sizes.

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Spicy Potato and Peas by Liz Canham

This combination of vegetables can be served with any grilled meat or vegetarian dish to give it that spicy oomph.

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Indian Cookery with a British Twist by Liz Canham

A different take on traditional Indian cooking.

In a traditional Indian home, the wife and mother does not go out to work. She stays at home and spends her days making sure that there is wholesome and tasty food ready for her family to eat whenever they may want it. If there are other older women in the household such as aunts or a grandmother, they will help too.

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India 2007 – Days 1 to 3 Delhi and Udaipur by Liz Canham

UdaipurArriving in Delhi in March, the temperature was somewhat higher than in Europe at about 30°C, but surprisingly, not unpleasant due to the lack of humidity. As this was our third visit to Delhi, the hustle and bustle of humanity, the porters vying to push our luggage trolley and the general feeling of organised chaos, came as little of a surprise. However, there were some changes since our last visit. The drive into the city seemed to take much less time than previously, I think because the road had been widened in places and the extension of the metro system had reduced the traffic by a minuscule but noticeable amount.In other respects, the journey was just the same; tuk tuks whizzing in and out of other traffic, hundreds of bicycles and motor scooters each with upwards of two passengers, overloaded buses and lorries and the ubiquitous Ambassador car.… Continue reading

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India 2007 – Days 4 to 6 – Bijaypur and Jaipur by Liz Canham

CHITTAURGARH FORTThe palace of Kumbha and Padmini’s Palace are but two of the beautifully carved edifices, which have been subject to restoration. Onwards from the fort and having travelled some distance on a very good road, our driver realised that he had missed our turning and wasted about an hour. Around we turned, eventually found the right turning then spent a further hour winding our way further and further uphill, until, if it weren’t for the frequent signposts to our hotel, we would have assumed that we had gone wrong again. ShareContinue reading

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India 2007 – Days 7 to 9 – Ranthambhore by Liz Canham

Tiger at RanthambhoreOne of our main reasons for travelling to India this time was the hope of seeing a tiger (or several) in the wild. We had been to Kenya many times and thus had seen a large variety of fascinating wild animals, including, lions, a cheetah, elephants, buffalo, giraffes and all sorts of antelopes, but of course tigers don’t live in Africa, so this was a big hole in our list of “must sees”.

We boarded our trusty Tata in Jaipur and headed for Ranthambhore, a four hour trip on reasonable roads and were, as ever, met with a cold face cloth and a cool fruit drink. Having made sure that we could join a safari bus the next morning, we were taken to our room, one of four in a bungalow in the lovely garden, and left to make ourselves at home.… Continue reading

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Cooking Indian Food at Home – Where to Start? by Liz Canham

If you read my article, Curry – A Journey, you’ll know that my first experiences of the dish were of the generic variety which the British invariably cooked and ate when living abroad a few decades ago. You’ll also know that I then discovered “real” Indian cookery and decided that as I couldn’t afford to eat out that much, I needed to learn how to cook the stuff myself.

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Indian Tandoori Cooking by Liz Canham

Traditionally, tandoori dishes are cooked in a tandoor, an oval shaped clay oven with a small fire in the bottom. The heat rises gradually but ultimately reaches a much higher temperature than a barbeque.

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Indian Food – What Makes Indian Cuisine Indian?

In one sense, the answer to the question asked by the heading is simple: that the recipe originates from India. Right, but unimportant. The real answer is a little more complicated, and interesting.

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